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Table 1 Study Sample Characteristics and Differences between Children Screened Negative vs. Positive for Behavior Problems

From: Validation of a cross-cultural instrument for child behavior problems: the Disruptive Behavior International Scale – Nepal version

Characteristic Screen negativea (n = 137) Screen positivea (n = 131) Overall Sample (N = 268)
n (%) n (%) n (%)
Sex (% female) 53 (39.0) 59 (45.0) 112 (42.0)
Mean Age (SD) 10.5 (2.9)* 9.7 (2.7)* 10.2 (2.8)
Parents’ marital status
 Married 132 (96.4) 126 (96.2) 258 (96.3)
 Divorced 0 (0) 1 (0.8) 1 (0.4)
 Widowed 3 (2.2) 2 (1.53) 5 (1.9)
 Separated 1 (0.7) 0 (0) 1 (0.4)
 Re-married 1 (0.7) 2 (1.5) 3 (1.1)
Family type
 Nuclear family 81 (59.1) 74 (57.4) 155 (58.3)
 Extended family 56 (40.9) 55 (42.6) 111 (41.7)
Caste/ethnicity
 Bahun/Chhetri 44 (32.4) 46 (35.1) 90 (33.6)
 Dalit 8 (5.9) 5 (3.8) 14 (5.2)
 Tharu 37 (27.2) 31 (23.7) 68 (25.4)
 Kumal 24 (17.7) 34 (26.0) 58 (21.6)
 Others 23 (16.9) 15 (11.5) 38 (14.2)
Religion
 Hindu 121 (88.3) 123 (93.4) 244 (91.0)
 Buddhist 13 (9.5) 6 (4.6) 19 (7.1)
 Christian 3 (2.2) 2 (1.5) 5 (1.9)
Parent working overseas 44 (32.1)* 61 (46.6)* 105 (39.2)
  1. aScreening status based on initial screening using vignettes
  2. *Significant (unadjusted) difference between screen-negative and screen-positive at p < 0.05 level (by t-test for continuous variables, chi-squared test for categorical variables)