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Table 1 Characteristics of excluded studies

From: Theory based interventions for caries related sugar intake in adults: systematic review

Reference Paper Title Participants Study Design Psychological Model Reasons for exclusion
Reisine et al. (1994) [27] A biopsychosocial model to predict caries in preschool children Children & parents Cross-sectional survey None specified Cross-sectional study
Astrøm & Rise (1996) [28] Analysis of adolescents’ beliefs about the outcome of using dental floss and drinking non-sugared mineral water. Adolescents Cross-sectional survey None specified Cross-sectional study and participants were adolescents
Astrøm, Awadia & Bjorvatn (1999) [29] Perceptions of susceptibility to oral health hazards: a study of women in different cultures. Adults Cross-sectional survey None specified Cross-sectional study
Roberts, Blinkhorn & Duxbury (2003) [30] The power of children over adults when obtaining sweet snacks. Children & parents Cross-sectional survey Theory of Reasoned Action Cross-sectional study
Adair et al. (2004) [31] Familial and cultural perceptions and beliefs of oral hygiene and dietary practices among ethnically and socio-economically diverse groups. Children Cross-sectional survey Theory of Planned Behaviour, Health Belief Model andthe Health Locus of Control Cross-sectional study and participants were children
Astrom (2004) [32] Validity of Cognitive Predictors of Adolescent Sugar Snack Consumption. Adolescents Cross-sectional survey Theory of planned behaviour Cross-sectional study and participants were adolescents.
Astrøm AN, & Okullo I., (2004) [33] Temporal stability of the theory of planned behavior: a prospective analysis of sugar consumption among Ugandan adolescents. Adolescents Cross-sectional survey Theory of planned behaviour Cross-sectional study
Skeie et al., (2006) [34] Parental risk attitudes and caries-related behaviours among immigrant and western native children in Oslo. Children & parents Cross-sectional survey Theory of planned behaviour, Sociallearning theory and the Health Belief Model. Health Locus of Control Cross-sectional study
Astrøm & Kiwanuka (2006) [35] Examining intention to control preschool children’s sugar snacking: a study of carers in Uganda. Children Cross-sectional survey Theory of planned behaviour Cross-sectional study and participants were children
Vanagas et al. (2009) [36] Associations between parental skills and their attitudes toward importance to develop good oral hygiene skills in their children. Adults Cross-sectional survey Theory of Planned Behaviour, Health Belief Model and the Health Locus of Control model, Cross-sectional study
Tolvanen et al. (2009) [37] Changes in children’s oral health-related behavior, knowledge and attitudes during a 3.4-yr. randomized clinical trial and oral health-promotion program. Children RCT None specified Participants were children and no Social Cognition Models identified
Harris et al. (2012) [24] One-to-one dietary interventions undertaken in a dental setting to change dietary behaviour. All ages Systematic Review (S.R) None specified No Social Cognition Models identified
Weber-Gasparoni et al. (2013) [38] An effective psychoeducational intervention for early childhood caries prevention: part 1 Children & parents RCT Self-determination theory (SDT) Participants were children
Weber-Gasparoni et al. (2013) [39] An effective psychoeducational intervention for early childhood caries prevention: part 2 Children & parents RCT Self-determination theory (SDT) Participants were children