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Table 1 Comparison of acoustic variables between sexes

From: Sex stereotypes influence adults’ perception of babies’ cries

Variable Boys’ cries (mean ± se) Girls’ cries (mean ± se) F p
%voiced 61.5 ± 2.3 65.6 ± 2.4 1.55 0.224
min F0 268 ± 11 287 ± 11 1.46 0.238
mean F0 443 ± 16 454 ± 17 0.26 0.614
max F0 663 ± 36 645 ± 38 0.11 0.747
F0CV 0.09 ± 0.02 0.08 ± 0.02 0.29 0.596
inflex25 5.7 ± 0.4 6.1 ± 0.5 0.43 0.517
inflex2 0.83 ± 0.08 1.02 ± 0.09 2.46 0.129
harm 15.6 ± 0.7 16.3 ± 0.8 0.39 0.537
jitter 0.004 ± 0.001 0.003 ± 0.001 0.06 0.802
shimmer 0.032 ± 0.007 0.028 ± 0.008 0.13 0.721
intCV 1.66 ± 0.05 1.59 ± 0.06 0.70 0.411
fsp1 1286 ± 69 1249 ± 75 0.13 0.722
fsp2 3123 ± 147 3108 ± 158 0.01 0.946
fsp3 5697 ± 258 5853 ± 278 0.17 0.683
fsp4 8377 ± 363 8688 ± 390 0.34 0.565
  1. Univariate Linear Mixed Models testing the effect of the sex of the baby on all 15 acoustic variables. The model included baby identity as a subject variable, and baby’s age and baby’s weight as random covariates (n 1  = 15 boys, n 2  = 13 girls). Degrees of freedom: 1 (numerator), 26 (denominator)